Eindrücke von der 17th ETN Konferenz in Leiden

Auf diesem Blog werde ich in den nächsten Wochen Bilder der 17. ETN Konferenz und des niederländischen „Textiel Festivals“ publizieren. Hier sind die ersten Bilder, alle von mir selbst gemacht ( andere Fotografen weden in der Bildunterschrift vermerkt)

Some participants of the 17th ETN Conference in Leiden on 16 May, 2015
Some participants of the 17th ETN Conference in Leiden on 16 May, 2015

Textiles in the context of the Stedelijk Museum and Dutch Design, Ingeborg de Roode The collection of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam holds around 90,000 objects, some 2000 of which are made from textiles. The collection encompasses large clusters of 'Bauhaus textiles', interior design and garment fabrics from the 50s and 60s and textile art created in the 60s and 70s
Textiles in the context of the Stedelijk Museum and Dutch Design, Ingeborg de Roode
The collection of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam holds around 90,000 objects, some 2000 of which are made from textiles. The collection encompasses large clusters of ‚Bauhaus textiles‘, interior design and garment fabrics from the 50s and 60s and textile art created in the 60s and 70s
Readable structures, Joke Robaard Since 2004 the Textile department of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy is called TXT: Textile and Text, these both words derive from the latin verb tessere, which means to weave. From that moment the department has developed an ongoing investigation in combining material research to theoretical research. Students are developing new forms of materialities: weaving, felting, knitting, printing. Dusty techniques are polished and re-implemented as new craftsmanship
Readable structures, Joke Robaard
Since 2004 the Textile department of the Gerrit Rietveld Academy is called TXT: Textile and Text, these both words derive from the latin verb tessere, which means to weave. From that moment the department has developed an ongoing investigation in combining material research to theoretical research. Students are developing new forms of materialities: weaving, felting, knitting, printing. Dusty techniques are polished and re-implemented as new craftsmanship
The TextielLab, a laboratory for research and experiments at the TextielMuseum, Hebe Verstappen The `beating heart`of the Dutch TextielMuseum is the TextielLab, a working place for research and experiments, in-between a specialised workshop and a laboratory for producing woven and knitted fabrics, prints, embroideries, tufted works and passementerie. Here designers, artists, students and companies from the Netherlands and from Europe, are assisted by project developers and technical experts to discover the endless possibilities in the exploration of yarns, computer-controlled techniques and handcraft.
The TextielLab, a laboratory for research and experiments at the TextielMuseum, Hebe Verstappen
The `beating heart`of the Dutch TextielMuseum is the TextielLab, a working place for research and experiments, in-between a specialised workshop and a laboratory for producing woven and knitted fabrics, prints, embroideries, tufted works and passementerie. Here designers, artists, students and companies from the Netherlands and from Europe, are assisted by project developers and technical experts to discover the endless possibilities in the exploration of yarns, computer-controlled techniques and handcraft.
Innovative Textiles, Lenneke Langenhuijsen of  Buro BELÉN Lenneke langenhuijsen and Brecht Duijf, founders of the design company BELÉN are designing from material. By broadening and expanding the material qualities of spaces, objects and products, they are creating tangible design for the future. Central to their approach are the intuitive, emotional and physical aspects of design, resulting in products and visions that show unexpected applications of material and colours, as well as revaluations of conventional techniques.
Innovative Textiles, Lenneke Langenhuijsen of Buro BELÉN
Lenneke langenhuijsen and Brecht Duijf, founders of the design company BELÉN are designing from material. By broadening and expanding the material qualities of spaces, objects and products, they are creating tangible design for the future. Central to their approach are the intuitive, emotional and physical aspects of design, resulting in products and visions that show unexpected applications of material and colours, as well as revaluations of conventional techniques.
The Importance of craftsmanship in Barbara Broekman´s work, Barbara Broekman In her work, Barbara Broekman pursues a direct confrontation with the senses. The large scale, deep colours, suggested movement and tangibility of the materials invoke a sensual experience. To stimulate, seduce and challenge people to have a close look: that is what Barbara Broekman aims to achieve.
The Importance of craftsmanship in Barbara Broekman´s work, Barbara Broekman
In her work, Barbara Broekman pursues a direct confrontation with the senses. The large scale, deep colours, suggested movement and tangibility of the materials invoke a sensual
experience. To stimulate, seduce and challenge people to have a close look: that is what Barbara Broekman aims to achieve.
Material Mentality?, Simone de Waart The lecture will show examples of current Dutch textile designs and  illustrate the sense of materials innovation for textiles.  The role of experiments will be discussed, experiments that both investigates in the possibilities as well as stretches the seams of craftsmanship, new materiality, technology, history and culture to create a textile future.
Material Mentality?, Simone de Waart
The lecture will show examples of current Dutch textile designs and illustrate the sense of materials innovation for textiles. The role of experiments will be discussed, experiments that both investigates in the possibilities as well as stretches the seams of craftsmanship, new materiality, technology, history and culture to create a textile future.
3D Printed Fashion: From the Computer to the Catwalk, Joris Debo, creative director, company Materialise Since Iris van Herpen’s first 3D printed piece took to the catwalk in 2011, a growing number of tech-savvy designers, fashion graduates and even a few high street labels have started to embrace the technology. When fashion and 3D Printing combine, the results have managed to capture the public’s imagination and spark conversation, but little is known about the process and challenges leading up to the big reveal. With this presentation, the aim is to give you a look behind the curtain of 3D printed fashion and show how designs by the likes of Iris van Herpen, Anouk Wipprecht, threeASFOUR, Studio XO and more are “materialised” using this incredible technology.
3D Printed Fashion: From the Computer to the Catwalk, Joris Debo, creative director, company Materialise
Since Iris van Herpen’s first 3D printed piece took to the catwalk in 2011, a growing number of tech-savvy designers, fashion graduates and even a few high street labels have started to embrace the technology. When fashion and 3D Printing combine, the results have managed to capture the public’s imagination and spark conversation, but little is known about the process and challenges leading up to the big reveal. With this presentation, the aim is to give you a look behind the curtain of 3D printed fashion and show how designs by the likes of Iris van Herpen, Anouk Wipprecht, threeASFOUR, Studio XO and more are “materialised” using this incredible technology.
Collecting and Structuring Marian Bijlenga collects art pieces from colleagues. In her talk she will discuss how she came to be a collector and in what way the items in her collection influence her own work. The preference for structuring, arranging and connecting evident in her work is reflected in the way she handles her collection. The walls of her home and workshop constitute an extension of her way of working.
Collecting and Structuring
Marian Bijlenga collects art pieces from colleagues. In her talk she will discuss how she came to be a collector and in what way the items in her collection influence her own work. The preference for structuring, arranging and connecting evident in her work is reflected in the way she handles her collection. The walls of her home and workshop constitute an extension of her way of working.
View at the Rijswijk Textile Biennial with the embroidered work of Chiachio & Giannone
View at the Rijswijk Textile Biennial with the embroidered work of Chiachio & Giannone
Rijswijk Biennial curator Anne Kloosterboer explaining the exhibition to her guests on 15 May 2015
Rijswijk Biennial curator Anne Kloosterboer explaining the exhibition to her guests on 15 May 2015

Curator Anne Kloosterboer (left) at the garden party in the garden of her Museum ; with Yosi Anya, Mexico and Beatrix Schaaf-Giesser, Germany (right)
Curator Anne Kloosterboer (left) at the garden party in the garden of her Museum ; with Yosi Anya, Mexico and Beatrix Schaaf-Giesser, Germany (right)

Cathryn Amidei (left) with participant of the TC2 Jacquard course at the Tilburg Textile Museum
Cathryn Amidei (left) with participant of the TC2 Jacquard course at the Tilburg Textile Museum

View at the results of the Doll´s Project , part of the festivities of the organisation Textiel Plus; one of the many interesting exhibitions in Leiden during the Dutch Textiel Festival, held every 5th year
View at the results of the Doll´s Project , part of the festivities of the organisation Textiel Plus; one of the many interesting exhibitions in Leiden during the Dutch Textiel Festival, held every 5th year